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Career Thought Leaders LinkedIn Group
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Executive Director

Board Members Emeritus

Thought Leadership Advisory Council

Michelle M. Carroll, MCDP,
GCDF-I, CCMC, Carroll Career Consultants, LLC


Cindy Kraft, CPBS, COIS, CCM, CCMC, CPRW, JCTC, CFO-Coach.com

Jan Melnik, M.A., MRW, CPRW, CCM, Absolute Advantage

Stephen Van Vreede, MBA, ACRW, CPRW, CSSBB, ITtechExec.com

Ruth Winden, CCMC, CJSS, CSMCS, Careers Enhanced

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Media/Speaker Queries:
You're invited to click on each Career Thought Leader's name above for full contact info and to inquire about availability for interviews and speaking engagements.
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CTL Bloggers:

Expert Voices in
Career Thought Leadership

BLOG MANAGER:

BLOG MODERATORS:





BLOGGERS:

Dr. Lisa Raufman, Ed.D., MFCT
El Camino College
Thought Leadership: Community College Career Counseling
Website: www.mystudentsuccesslab.com
Email:
Phone: 310-660-3593 ext 3435

Good Jobs are Back for College Graduates

The Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce is an independent, nonprofit research and policy institute that studies the link between individual goals, education and training curricula, and career pathways. The Center is affiliated with the Georgetown McCourt School of Public Policy.

Their most recent research: Good Jobs Are Back: College Graduates Are First in Line is available online at http://cew.georgetown.edu/goodjobsareback.
This research reveals that our economy has added 6.6 million jobs since 2010, 2.9 million of which were good jobs. These jobs paid more than $53,000, tended to be full time and provided health insurance and retirement plans. Of these jobs, 2.8 million went to college graduates.  Both good jobs and low-wage jobs have recovered all recession job losses.

The majority of good jobs added during the recovery were in managerial (1,780,000), STEM occupations (880,000 jobs) and healthcare professional occupations (445,000 jobs). Among the middle-wage jobs tier, occupations that make up the blue-collar cluster gained the most jobs (860,000). Among the low-wage jobs tier, food, personal services and sales and office support occupations added the most jobs during the recovery (1,053,000).

The downside of this recovery, researchers find, is that middle-wage jobs have not fully recovered: in spite of the 1.9 million jobs added in the recovery, middle-wage jobs remain 900,000 jobs below their pre-recession employment level.

One other interesting research article at the Center on Education and the Workforce is called “The Economic Value of College Majors found at
https://cew.georgetown.edu/cew-reports/valueofcollegemajors/

The Economic Value of College Majors uses Census Data to analyze wages for 137 college majors to detail the most popular college majors, the majors that are most likely to lead to an advanced degree, and the economic benefit of earning an advanced degree by undergraduate major.
This report finds that top-paying college majors earn $3.4 million more than the lowest-paying majors over a lifetime. Two of the top highest paying majors, STEM and Business are also the most popular majors, accounting for 46 percent of college graduates.

In prior reports, CEW, provided us with the following information:
• The United States invests roughly $1.4 trillion in human capital development each year. National spending on the five Career and Technical Education (CTE) pathways totals $524 billion annually
• The United States is ranked second internationally in baccalaureate attainment, but ranks 16th in sub-baccalaureate (CTE) attainment.

Creative Ways to Find Jobs

Colleagues have asked me for some creative ways to find jobs, internships or people who would have the power to hire. I like to think of new and different ways to do this and here are a few suggestions:

According to a Fortune 500 HR expert on Jobipedia.org:
To find jobs at a business of your choice, one method is to go to the company website or twitter handle and see what jobs are being posted by the company. Additionally, a job seeker can enter an occupation, location or combination of the two, plus .JOBS, to find opportunities directly from their browser. Examples include: ibm.jobs, att.jobs, or Texas.jobs, Sales.jobs or AtlantaNursing.jobs

A few other websites that include job/internship information that you would ordinarily miss:
www.twellow.com
Find people to follow on Twitter by category. Find people who are influencers in your local community. Find Human Resources contacts for companies and they will announce their openings before others get the information on job boards. Or follow companies on Facebook and “like” them. When you write a cover letter for a job opening let them know that you have been following them on Twitter and Facebook. They will consider you to be more creative and interested compared to other applicants.

http://www.foundationccc.org/WhatWeDo/StudentJobs/tabid/356/default.aspx
From the California Community College Chancellor’s Office. They will be launching a program called Launchpad for Internships that should go statewide in the next year.

http://www.pacific-gateway.org/add-resource
This is an example of a community workforce development program with many links.

http://www.cornerstoneondemand.com/blog/category/future-of-work
This is an interesting millennial written website that includes career development info.

www.themuse.com
Very creative millennial oriented career website.

Interesting Career Blogs

I am a member of the National Career Development Association’s Technology Committee. A webinar next week on April 28 at 1pm Central time will be led by Melissa Venable regarding becoming a career blogger. As a member of the committee, we were asked to contribute a few of our favorite websites for career blogs. The following of the ones I chose for their diverse voices and topics. I could have picked any association as all associations seem to have blogs attached to their websites but I choose a professional career association to start my list.

National Association of Colleges and Employers – an association’s blog:
http://blog.naceweb.org/

Career Thought Leaders Website- one example:
http://www.careerthoughtleaders.com/blog/author/lisa-raufman/

Jibber Jobber – job search website:
http://www.jibberjobber.com/blog/

Penelope Trunk- a Millennial’s point of view:
http://blog.penelopetrunk.com/2015/01/28/career-trajectory-of-the-fast-rising-star/

Science Magazine blogs:
http://nextwave.sciencemag.org

Monster’s Blog
http://benta-jobs-monster.blogspot.com/2015/02/the-top-20-most-promising-american.html#.VTMu55PGr-6

Professional Associations help with Networking

Because I am an author of a well known Career Development textbook that has been published in China, The Career Fitness Program, Exercising Your Options, I was invited to speak as a “cultural lecturer” at Shenzhen Polytechnic University in January.

Excellent Resources from University Career Centers

I have gotten clients to do additional research about careers and the job market because I have found websites that they enjoy exploring. Many of our students like to read blogs and “believe” the advice they get from real students who have gone through the career search experience . Below you will find very user friendly websites from universities across the United States. If there is a * next to the name, it means that the first entry is a blog by students at that university.

List of resources at sample university career centers:

Colgate University
http://colgate.edu/distinctly-colgate/intellectual-engagement
http://colgate.edu/campus-life/career-services/explore-majors-and-careers/learn-about-careers

Columbia University
http://www.careereducation.columbia.edu/
http://www.careereducation.columbia.edu/resources/industry
(Be sure to note the social media and job boards connected with each industry)

Harvard University*
http://ocsharvard.tumblr.com/
http://ocsharvard.tumblr.com/tagged/careerfair
http://www.ocs.fas.harvard.edu/students.htm

Tufts*
http://tuftscareercenter.blogspot.com/
http://www.tufts.edu/home/students/career_services/

UC Berkeley
https://career.berkeley.edu/Major/Major.stm
https://career.berkeley.edu/Info/CareerExp.stm

University of Central Oklahoma*
http://careers.uco.edu/resources/index.asp

University of Oregon*
https://career.uoregon.edu/blog/students
https://career.uoregon.edu/students/programs-services/job-internship-databases

Being a Visionary Career Counselor/Coach

We now know that 50-60% of jobs that will be available 5-10 years from now have either not been invented or are not commonly available. How do we know what will be the real jobs of the very near future and help people prepare for them?

On June 19th, I will be conducting a Roundtable at NCDA in Long Beach with Danita Redd. Our topic is Being a Visionary Career Counselor. For this blog I am sharing some interesting future jobs that can be found at http://coeccc.net/STEMin20/. For example, click on that page and scroll down to Industries of the future. Then go to Jobs For the Future. The information that you will find are real examples for training and education. On that page you can clickon these job titles and find out more about them.
JOBS FOR THE FUTURE: The STEM in 20- a few samples

Book to App Converters
Matter Programmers
Smart Grid Game Mechanics
Chef-Farmers
Neuromarketers
Space Haulers & Recyclers
Cognitive Ecologists
Personal Care Coordinators
Talent Aggregators
Data Intensive Nurses
Pre-Crime Analysts
Urban Agriculturalists
Digital Archaeologists
Self-Quantification Coaches
Visual Analytics Experts
Ethno-Cultural Ambassadors
Smart Contacts Developers
Global Sourcing Managers
Smart Dust Programmers

The STEM in 20 project was made possible by an SB70 grant from the California Community Colleges Chancellor’s Office.
Here is another list from way back in 2011; go to http://www.futuristspeaker.com/2011/11/55-jobs-of-the-future/ Let me know what you if you think the future is starting to happen!

In a future blog, I will provide you with some other websites that help me stay on top of the careers of the future. Feel free to write to me and let me know what you use to be a “visionary” career counselor/coach.

Employment Trend: Bid for Projects in this Gig Economy

 

I am still finding new research on what is happening to our changing job market at Georgetown University’s Center for Education and the Workforce:

http://cew.georgetown.edu/failuretolaunch/

Between 1980 and 2012, significant structural economic shifts produced a new postsecondary phase in the labor market entry of young adults, delaying their career launch. Older adults are working longer; however, they are not crowding young adults out of the labor market. In fact, today there are more job openings per young person resulting from retirements than there were in the 1990s.

 

The report’s major findings are:

In 1980, young adults reached the middle of the wage distribution at age 26; today, they do not reach the same point until age 30. For young African Americans, it has increased from age 25 to 33.

• Young adults’ labor force participation rate has returned to its 1972 level, a decline that started in the late 1980s and has accelerated since 2000.

• Older workers aren’t crowding young adults out of the labor market: there are more job openings created from retirements per young person today than there were in the 1990s

• The 2000s were a lost decade for young adults. Between 2000 and 2012, the employment rate for young fell from 84 percent to 72 percent.

• Opportunities have especially dwindled for young men, high school graduates, and young African Americans.

Many career counselors are seeing these 30 to 40 year olds living at home with their parents until they eventually get full time jobs. However, in order to achieve getting that full time job that can allow them to live on their own, they must often get short term and part time jobs that can eventually build their resume so that they have recency and new accomplishments in their chosen fields. Don’t settle for a job at Home Depot or Target. Rather, try bidding for projects in this new “Gig Economy”.

If you know someone who needs to get some recent experience, refer them to these two websites:

www.Elance.com and

www.chacha.com

At these types of sites, you can “bid” for projects to complete and build a new portfolio!

 

Get Recent Experience by “Bidding” on Short Term Projects

I am still finding new research on what is happening to our changing job market at Georgetown University’s Center for Education and the Workforce:
http://cew.georgetown.edu/failuretolaunch/
Between 1980 and 2012, significant structural economic shifts produced a new postsecondary phase in the labor market entry of young adults, delaying their career launch. Older adults are working longer; however, they are not crowding young adults out of the labor market. In fact, today there are more job openings per young person resulting from retirements than there were in the 1990s.

The report’s major findings are:
In 1980, young adults reached the middle of the wage distribution at age 26; today, they do not reach the same point until age 30. For young African Americans, it has increased from age 25 to 33.
• Young adults’ labor force participation rate has returned to its 1972 level, a decline that started in the late 1980s and has accelerated since 2000.
• Older workers aren’t crowding young adults out of the labor market: there are more job openings created from retirements per young person today than there were in the 1990s
• The 2000s were a lost decade for young adults. Between 2000 and 2012, the employment rate for young fell from 84 percent to 72 percent.
• Opportunities have especially dwindled for young men, high school graduates, and young African Americans.
Many career counselors are seeing these 30 to 40 year olds living at home with their parents until they eventually get full time jobs. However, in order to achieve getting that full time job that can allow them to live on their own, they must often get short term and part time jobs that can eventually build their resume so that they have recency and new accomplishments in their chosen fields. Don’t settle for a job at Home Depot or Target. Rather, try bidding for projects in this new “Gig Economy”.
If you know someone who needs to get some recent experience, refer them to these two websites:
www.Elance.com and
www.chacha.com
At these types of sites, you can “bid” for projects to complete and build a new portfolio!

Georgetown University Research on Employment Trends

For those of you who have heard recent news reports that students graduating from college can’t get a job. From Georgetown University’s Center on the Workforce:

• Most college graduates complete their degrees in May or June and enter the labor force in the summer.
• In 2013, the number of new Bachelor’s degree graduates entering the labor market was 1.7 million.
• Each summer, these new college graduates increase … Read more

Career-Life Path: Quick Tips for Finding It

What catches your imagination that you’ve never tried to do? This relates not just to your hobbies or current job but to your calling in life; it leads to the larger message of your life.

Two short blogs from Rizwan Virk, an entrepreneur, author, investor, and film-maker found in http://zenentrepreneur.blogspot.com illustrates that the same skills and imagination needed to create your own business can be used to create your own career.
In http://venturevillage.eu/the-career-warrior-how-to-achieve-spiritual-and-business-bliss, Rizwan writes: … Read more